Pt. 13: Call To Duty

After only a month of advanced amphibious training at Ft. Pierce, the commanding officer of the Amphibious Training Base sent a troop movement order to Joe McDevitt. If you have never seen a US Navy troop order circa 1943, the cover letter  of that important document reads as follows:

UNITED STATES ATLANTIC FLEET

AMPHIBIOUS FORCES

US NAVAL AMPHIBIOUS TRAINING BASE

FORT PIERCE, FLORIDA

FR25-6/P16-4/00/MM                                                                                   15 February, 1944

Serial: 485

RESTRICTED

 

From:           Commanding Officer

To:                Lt. (jg) Joseph B. MCDEVITT, D-V(G), USNR

Subject:       Orders – Troop Movement

    1.               The following are hereby detached from their present duty with the U.S. Naval Amphibious Base, Fort Pierce, Florida and any other such duties which may have been assigned them, and when directed, Lt. (jg) Joseph B. MCDEVITT USNR will take charge of Twenty-Five (25) Four (4) man boat crews and Two (2) Five (5) man boat crews and Fifteen (15) other Enlisted Personnel and proceed immediately with Ensign Orville W. Terry (Asst. Commander), Ensign Francis W. Toon (Asst. Commander),  Ensign Charles R. Reeves, Ensign Harry W. Stauffacher, Ensign James O. Smith jr., Ensign Willard W. Trask, Ensign Merle H. Tigerman, Ensign Leon S. Eckman, Ensign Paul S. Kemner, Ensign Jesse Schwartz, Ensign Samuel W. Seidel, Ensign Alton R. Swift to New York Navy Yard. Upon arrival you will report to the Commandant New York Navy Yard for further transfer to the USS LEON, in whatever port she may be, for duty.

2.              This is a troop movement and the Disbursing Officer, U.S. Naval Amphibious Training Base, Fort Pierce, Florida is hereby authorized and directed to furnish the necessary transportation , subsistence and baggage transfers for the proper execution of these orders.

3.               The Disbursing Officer is hereby authorized and directed to close out the pay accounts of the men in your charge and deliver them to the Personnel Office.

4.               The records and accounts of the men in your charge are handed you herewith for safe delivery to their new Commanding Officer.

5.               These orders are of a restricted nature and should not be divulged to any unauthorized persons.

C. GULBRANSON

Attached to these orders was a complete listing of the 125 enlisted personnel who would operate and maintain 26 landing craft, including twenty-four LCVPs and two LCMs. We used that list earlier to help identify some of the sailors pictured in the Irwin Goldstein family collection (see blog posts dated March 7, March 16, and June 3, 2017.) We will try to identify more of those young heroes in future posts.

The list of fifteen officers named above will also be used in forthcoming stories to help identify officers and share pictures from the more recent Toon Family album.

If you recognize pictures or names of any of these young men, please contact us!

One final note. On precisely the same date that these orders were sent to Joe McDevitt in Florida (February 15, 1944), personnel at New York’s naval shipyard snapped the official file photo of the ship that would be home for McDevitt’s boat group for two years. She was a brand spanking new attack transport: USS LEON APA 48.

Leon Shipyard Picture

Notice to Amphibious Forces, United States Pacific Fleet: Reinforcement is on the way.

 

 

 

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Meet Five More Sailors From the USS Leon

Thanks to the family of Irwin Goldstein, we now have pictures of five more sailors who served in the Pacific during WWII. As always, if you recognize names or pictures of one or more of the young men below, please contact us!

S1c Irwin Goldstein was a member of the boat group aboard the attack transport USS Leon. Fortunately for all of us, Irwin took lots of pictures of his buddies when they were on leave from April 1944 through January 1946. (Most of his buddies—though not all—were members of Leon’s boat group.) Then Irwin did the most wonderful thing… he put names on the pictures and saved them for us!!

Irwin’s family has shared those pictures with us, and we have confirmed the identities of a group of those sailors as crewmen of the Leon. Here are five more of those handsome young men who served hard duty in the Pacific.

Al Kraft

This is S1c Albert P. Kraft from Amherst NY. The other three members of Al’s boat crew were Frank F. Usefara, Albert T. Kauffman, and Raymond A. McClary. Their supervising officer was Ensign Leon S. Eckman.

Anthony Visconti

Meet S1c Anthony A. Visconti. Anthony’s boat crew also included Gilbert R. Ward, William H. Vieau, and Henry V. Mayer. Commanding officer: Ensign Alton R. Swift.

Ed Baker

Here is S1c Edward Baker from Chicago IL. Ed served with Dorries J. Byars, Edward O. Cathcart, and Emmitt N. Droll. Ensign Paul S. Kemner was their direct superior.

Ernest Johnson, Coxswain

This is Ernest M. Johnson from North Adams MA. He served with J.C. Biesterveld, Harold O. Hausrath, and Gerald E. Dreaver under Ensign Paul S. Kemner.

Farrell Thomas J (2)

The last shipmate is S1c Thomas J. Farrell, address unknown. Ensign Sam Seidel supervised Thomas and his crewmates: John Frederick, Edwin G. Howell, and Raymond J. Manley.

These men trained together with the rest of Leon’s crew to perform the key mission of the amphibious forces: Putting the boots on the beaches… Any beach, any time!

Shore Leave Pearl Harbor

Thanks to Justin Goldstein for assistance with this story.


Anyone who is interested in WWII history in the Pacific theater has seen countless pictures like the one below from the Irwin Goldstein Collection. After hard duty cruising the Pacific for months on end, there was nothing like leave at Pearl Harbor. Girls, beer, and dry land!

These five young fellas were from the crew of the USS Leon APA 48. All of them were members of the ship’s boat group. They were the boat crews who delivered the Marines and soldiers to the beaches, any beach… any time.

IG

Five Good Buddies

We don’t know the exact date the picture was taken, but the scrawl on the back says,

“After  the Invasion of Saipan at P.H.”

They were happy to be ashore, but we notice no big smiles here after Saipan. They’d landed 1382 healthy young Marines from the FOURTH Division and shortly thereafter transported 307 of them wounded and dying back to the ship. No one was guaranteed tomorrow.

There was more to come. Their next four amphibious assaults: Angaur (Palau Islands), Leyte and Luzon (Philippines), and Okinawa (Ryukyu Islands).

We’re pretty darned certain of the identities of these five sailors, but please correct us if we’re wrong. Either way, if you see one of your family here, we would love to hear from you!

In the front row is S1c M. C. Weisenburg (Izzy) from Baltimore, MD. The middle row (l) is S1c John T. Duffy from Pittsburgh, PA, and the middle (r) is Cox Ernest M. Johnson from North Adams, MA. The back (l) is S1c Glenn J. Dickinson from Granville, MA, and (r) is S1c Irwin Goldstein from New York, NY.

And here’s the good part. They all came home!


Picture: Irwin Goldstein Collection